Training Articles

The Basics of Kinetic Chain Dysfunctions in Sports Performance Training

The kinetic chain of the human body is comprised of the articular, muscular, and nervous systems. It is these three sub-systems of the kinetic working interdependently to create efficient movement within the human body. Dysfunctional movement patterns within the human body and  during athletic actions are a result of impairments within these systems of the kinetic chain. Breakdowns within the articular, neural, and muscular system results in Serial Distortion Patterns. A serial distortion pattern refers to the situation where the integrity of the...

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Sports Performance Guidelines for Baseball

To improve performance, increase bat speed, throwing accuracy, sprinting ability, change of direction, and prevent injury in your game, it is necessary to develop the “five physical pillars” of the kinetic chain. Empirical evidence also suggests it is best to develop these physical components in order. Begin with mobility, then progressing to neuromuscular efficiency, and completing the process with power training. Following this sequence provides the correct ratios of mobility to stability, and prevents the possibility of injury to a...

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Power Development Guidelines for Sport Performance

The development of speed, power, and the ability to change direction in sport requires the athlete to generate high force output levels in a short amount of time. The ability to create maximum performance in these aforementioned sport components requires power. Power is in the most basic terms strength plus speed. The ability of the strength and conditioning professional to develops these components within the kinetic chain can exponentially increase the performance parameters of the athlete in their chosen sport. Power...

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Core Performance Training Guidelines

The core is an integral part of performance training as this anatomical area of the kinetic chain is integral in the stabilization of kinetic chain during athletic actions, a generator of rotary power, and integral in the transfer of kinetic energy from lower extremities to the upper body. Recognition of the importance this anatomical section of the body plays in athletics it is imperative the development of the core consists of a comprehensive series of training modalities. These training modalities will focus on developing neuromuscular control,...

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Functional Anatomy of the Hip Complex

The Hip Complex is an oft discussed anatomical area of the kinetic chain when discussing performance training. I recall sitting on a discussion board with Mark Verstegan of Athlete’s Performance a few years ago and question came from the audience on the importance of the hips relative to performance training. Mark began answering the question by stating the hip joint within the kinetic chain consists of over 20 muscular attachments. Just recognizing this statement in of itself points to the importance...

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Golf Fitness and Mobility Requirements of the Golf Swing

The phrases “flexibility”, “range of motion”, and “rotation” coincide with execution of the golf swing. In general these terms refer to physical requirements required to perform the athletic actions associated with the golf swing. The amateur player quite often refers to needing to be flexible (or lack thereof when unable to execute the golf swing) to position the body correctly at address, create rotation around a fixed spine angle, make a full shoulder turn, etc. The reality is the body requires...

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Hip Mobility and Core Stability for the Golf Swing

“The Hips and Core are major components on the physical side of the equation of the golf swing. Developing the required levels of joint mobility and stabilization strength are integral for the golfer to execute a proficient golf swing. Limitations in either of these physical components can easily impede one’s ability execute a competent golf swing.” – Sports Performance Coach Sean Cochran Q: Sean, in your opening statement you stated the importance of the hips and core relative to the golf...

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Kinetic Chain Mobility & Stability

"Executing a proficient golf swing or any athletic action requires certain levels of joint mobility and segmental stability within the kinetic chain. Dysfunctional movement patterns, alterations in swing mechanics, and the increase in the potential for injury exist when limitations are apparent in the mobility and stability components of the body." - Sports Performance Coach Sean Cochran Q: Sean, please explain the terms joint mobility and segmental stability. Joint mobility can be defined as the optimal range of motion of a joint...

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The Aging Golfer Athlete

"The aging process for the professional or amateur golfer requires attention in terms of proper preparation from the physical side of the equation in order to negate the effects of "father time." It is scientifically proven the aging process adversely affects the kinetic chain in terms of one's mobility, segmental stability, balance capacities, speed generation, and strength capacities" - Sports Performance Coach Sean Cochran The Aging Process: The aging process invariably affects the kinetic chain in an adverse manner. It is...

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Golf Swing Faults & The Body

"Execution of an mechanically efficient golf swing where each phase of the swing remains intact and speed is generated into the impact position does require a physical foundation supporting the mechanics of the golf swing. If physical dysfunctions exist within the kinetic chain, execution of a proficient golf swing will most likely be impeded." - Sean Cochran Q: Sean, in your opening statement you state it is necessary for the golfer to have a physical foundation in order to execute a...

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